}
Filter By Type
Filter By Category
Sort By
543 results for Digital Faith Formation
Collection
Program Planning in Faith Communities
Curator Tim Shapiro
Collection
Congregational Communication Resources
Curator Matt Burke
organization
LifelongFaith Associates
Led by John Roberto, this organization helps congregations develop sustainable faith formation with a host of modern discipleship tools for the whole congregation.
article New
Resource List for Online Church
Written during COVID-19, this succinct guide quickly empowers congregations to transition to online platforms.
web resource New
Concerning COVID-19
This website provides guidelines for compassionate congregations during a crisis, instructions for live streaming and mass messaging, plus creative worship and faith formation resources.
article
Digital Disciples
This article looks at how one pastor was able to incorporate technology and social media to benefit faith formation of youth.
For The CRG Created For The CRG
Faith Life: A Millennial Perspective

Most people can carry a casual conversation with a young adult. If that seems like a challenge in your congregation, check out the first part of this blog Relationships: A Millennial Perspective.


How about discussing values and faith beliefs with that younger generation? It’s accurate to say “times have changed.” In many parts of the United States, it’s no longer assumed that people go to worship every week. This makes conversations about faith challenging –but not impossible.


As a congregational consultant and millennial, here’s what I think you should know about millennials and faith.


We value spirituality and group connection. Contrary to statistics declaring the decline of religion in America, millennials do care about spirituality. It just looks different. Consider the Harvard Divinity study How We Gather. Thriving millennial movements like Crossfit and The Dinner Party draw upon common elements: community, personal and social transformation, purpose finding, creativity and accountability.


Action step: Evaluate which of those elements your congregation does well. Practice talking about those benefits and invite potential newcomers.


Value us through hospitality. I appreciate worship services that allow casual clothes and free coffee. It’s not about the cool leader in jeans or the best local brew. It’s about inviting us to come as we are. If it’s between wearing jeans and not showing up, it’s better to have us show up in jeans.


Action step: Take time to evaluate the new visitor experience. This list of 50 Ways to Welcome New People will help. While staying true to your congregation’s culture, eliminate unnecessary discomfort for visitors.


We are likely to question faith and require a safe space to do that. Rather than accepting doctrine or marketing, young adults prioritize exploration and personal experiences to determine their beliefs. This allows for rich, yet messy, thinking. Author of The New Copernicans Dr. John Seel explains this well. I highly recommend checking out his book.


Action step: Practice active listening and humility to prioritize relationships. This is especially important when the other person doesn’t share your beliefs. Celeste Headlee’s TEDTalk will help you brush up on conversation skills. Once you build a trusting space, it becomes easier to dialogue about faith.


For The CRG Created For The CRG
The Formative Power of Your Congregation

Many elements make you the person you are. You are shaped by your race, your geographic location, and your genetic structure. Your personality is formed by your family, your friends, and the choices you make along the way. You are influenced by education, social affiliations and friendships.

All of us are formed by the company we keep. The company we keep includes the congregation you attend. Whether you are aware of it or not, the activities of your congregation create certain thoughts, feelings and behaviors that make you who you are. In this way, your congregation has formative power.

Life together
I was reminded of the importance of being part of a religious community when a clergy person described a project happening in his congregation. He told me about a booklet being produced by the staff called Rule of Life. The Rule of Life is a guidebook outlining what it means to be part of the congregation.

The pastor says, “We want to encourage people to live a certain way of life.” Part of the guidebook is written as a catechism with answers to be learned and recited. Other parts of the guide describe specific practices in which one participates as a member of the congregation: at noon every day we are going to pray this Psalm.

If you read Psalm 23 every day, that Psalm is going to become part of who you are. The virtue of trust represented in the lines of the Psalm will more likely become part of your heart, mind and soul.

What elements are most formative in a congregation?
Of course, it depends on the particular congregation. I have observed and experienced the following activities having a positive impact on adherents:


  • Testimony, telling the story of their lives

  • Religious practices, particularly worship, prayer, singing, study of scripture, and rites of passages or sacraments

  • Reflection on practice: not just doing things but thinking about their impact with others

  • Relationships including across generations

  • Liminal experiences: pilgrimages, mission trips, cross-cultural experiences, spiritual retreats

Sharing stories
Here is an exercise to consider doing with a congregational board, team or class.

Remember a time when a congregational experience formed or reinforced a positive attribute in you. Write down the experience. Take turns sharing the stories out loud. Listeners are invited to ask open, curious questions to enhance group reflection. What themes are evident? What further growth might the congregation support?

Resources you can use
To consider this subject more, look at these resources: the books In Search of Wisdom, Community: The Structure of Belonging, and Living into Community.

 

book
Reimagining Faith Formation for the 21st Century: Engaging All Ages and Generations
This book offers a conceptual framework for faith formation in a changing world. Practical insights will help leaders understand and implement effective ministry strategies.
article
Faith Formation in Adulthood
This resource combines theoretical and practical information to cover what a congregation needs to know about adult faith formation and why it matters.
book
Faith Formation 2020: Designing the Future of Faith Formation
This resource presents diverse ways to look at the future of faith formation, highlighting strategies for bringing faith to life.
article
Faith Formation Across the Generations
This article describes various aspects of intergenerational learning. Topics include the benefits of learning together, how to host a gathering, and ways to apply it in your congregation.
Add to Collection
Bookmark resources to group them into personalized collections
Cookies help us deliver our services. By using our services, you agree to our use of cookies.