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4 Steps to Free Community Data

In the last few years there’s been a surge of congregations interested in their communities. Nearly 10% of all Center for Congregations calls include some type of community involvement. For many congregations, the first step is to gather data about the area.

The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) provides the ARDA Community Profile Builder, a free demographic data tool for clergy and lay leaders to learn about people and assets in their communities. This unique tool allows users to view the many characteristics of their communities by searching by ZIP code or local address.

How to Use the Community Profile Builder

 


  1. Go to this web address: http://www.thearda.com/demographicMap/ and enter your ZIP code, city and state, or address in the box at the top of the page and click “Go.” After clicking “Go,” the map will take you to your community and show you all congregations in the area.

  2. Enter the radius (in miles) that you would like the online tool to include. One option is to think of driving distance. How far do people typically travel to attend your congregation?

  3. Click on the map to set the center point for the radius you selected. A dashed circle will appear showing you the areas from which the tool will draw its data.

  4. Click the “Profile” button. This will generate your report for the area you selected.

The generated report can include eight different community metrics from religion and housing to income level and ethnicity. It can even include population projections.

Using the Data

This data can help your congregation consider community needs before investing your resources. As an example, in the report you just created look at the Gender/Age tab. A growing number of children could mean an opportunity for children’s programming or a daycare. On the other hand, if there are no young adults nearby, you could make a strategic decision to focus your efforts elsewhere. You might even consider a new building location based on community factors.Want to start learning about your community based on data and not conjecture? Go to http://www.thearda.com/demographicMap/ to get started!

ARDA’s Community Profile Builder is completely free thanks to generous support from the Lilly Endowment and others. The ARDA, which is housed at Pennsylvania State University and has been online since 1998, has more than 16 million pages of content, from profiles of hundreds of past and present religious groups in America to denominational reports and survey findings. Thanks to ARDA Assistant Director Andrew Whitehead for providing this information.

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Creating a Good Virtual Worship Experience

I’ve “attended” several synagogue and church worship services over the last weeks and must report my disappointment. That’s a nice way of saying that most really stink. Live streaming a regular worship service just doesn’t work.



Remember that as soon as you put something on a screen, the viewer compares it to everything else they see on their screens. I’m not suggesting you need a full multicamera production, but sticking a laptop in front of the sanctuary does not cut it.



There are lots of churches which offer well done, live services online. Many are megachurches that do this weekly. You don’t have to match the professional productions of megachurches, but think about raising your standards of excellence.


Some things to keep in mind:




  • Is your sanctuary the best place to hold an online worship service? If it’s a large cavernous space, probably not since you’ll likely have audio and lighting issues.


  • Can people hear everything well? The microphone in a laptop or webcam isn’t adequate, especially if it’s not within 3-5 feet from the worship leader. Purchase a simple, inexpensive, USB microphone and move it close to your presenter. Better yet, get several lavalier type mics and a small mixer that feeds your computer.


  • Is the video clear and well lit? Even cheap, high definition webcams are better than most stock cameras in laptops (not necessarily true for some smart phones). And they’re inexpensive. A separate camera allows you to position the camera where it sees the best not where the computer sits best.


  • If you’re using one camera as a catch-all, keep the view tight. Have worship leaders stand close together. Most sanctuaries are too dark for video and lit to focus on certain spots that aren’t optimal for video casting.


  • Don’t ask people to download worship documents beforehand, include them in the experience. This is tougher to do since you’ll need a way to split the screen. If that’s not an option, an alternative is showing just the text during singing and responsive readings. Not only is it easier to view but helps break up the visuals and monotony.


  • If your worship service is boring it will be more boring on video. Consider modifying your normal service. Most importantly, make it shorter, focused and familiar. Remember, your audience is sitting in front of a computer or holding their phones. People want the familiar and the comfortable.


  • Form a team to help. That team may be two people, and that may be enough. Have someone else (not your worship leader) run the computer and handle technical issues.


  • Rehearse! Even if it’s 30 minutes before you go live, practice! You will find things you didn’t think about. Nothing kills the moment worse than congregants watching you mess around trying to fix stuff. Oh, and by the way, start on time!



Resources You Can Use
Here’s a great list of online church resources from PRC-Practical Resources for Churches.  
Using a cell phone and Facebook for livestreaming, check out https://thecrg.org/resources/introduction-to-live-streaming  
A guide to using Facebook Live can be found here: https://www.thecrg.org/resources/how-to-use-facebook-live-the-ultimate-guide

This article first appeared at https://ejewishphilanthropy.com/virtual-worship/

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Congregational Resources during COVID-19

During the rapidly evolving pandemic, please know that your congregation is not alone. We offer this short list of resources that you might continue your work faithfully and safely.

Looking for different resources? Get information that meets your needs by connecting with us at info@thecrg.org or click Chat with an Expert at the bottom of this page.

Resource List for Online Church

This succinct guide quickly connects leaders to information on a variety of topics: COVID-19 processes and checklists, streaming software and equipment, faith formation, online giving and recorded webinars.

Concerning COVID-19

The Episcopal Church provides guidelines for compassionate Christians, instructions for live streaming and mass messaging, plus creative worship and faith formation resources.

Coronavirus Resources for the Church

This Wheaton College resource center offers a congregational planning manual (also available in Spanish), a free weekly webinar to prepare congregations for the coronavirus, a free online summit starting March 26, as well as tip sheets and links to top resources.

How to Lead Calmly in a Global Outbreak

In this article, experienced pastors George Mason and Mark Wingfield provide a pep-talk for faith leaders to lead calmly in a time of crisis.

Q&A: How to care for the elderly without putting them at risk of coronavirus

In this article, the chief medical officer at AARP offers advice for common COVID questions and how to support elderly loved ones.

Virtual Shabbat Box

Create a virtual shabbat with short meditations and readings. Instead of a physical group gathering, engage the senses through rituals that heal the body, mind, and spirit.

Resources for Community- and Faith-Based Leaders

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers official information for emergency planning and action steps, verified information about the virus, cleaning and disinfecting practices, and important organizational practices.

Three Big Communication Mistakes Organizations are Making During the COVID-19 Crisis

Communications leader Kem Meyer offers advice to organizations about communications during the pandemic.

 

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Talking About Racism

Many congregations are looking for resources to help them talk about racism. White congregations want to prepare for dialogue with their multi-cultural neighbors. They want to learn more about the historical roots of racism and how it has become ingrained through social and economic structures.


Among the many fine books available, there is one curriculum that stands out as practical, accessible, and free. White Privilege: Let’s Talk – a Resource for Transformational Dialogue is a free, downloadable curriculum from the United Church of Christ.


It is designed to engage participants in “safe, meaningful, substantive, and bold” conversations on race. The curriculum contains background reading, webinars, and a conversation guide.


To get a feel for the material, it may be helpful to watch one of the five accompanying webinars, such as Whiteness as the Norm. For congregations who want to delve more deeply into racial issues impacting communities of faith, take a look at https://thecrg.org/search/results?query=race.


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Podcast: Productive Learning on the Run


As a consultant with the Center for Congregations, I travel a good bit. Sometimes I spend several hours in the car on a given day. While it’s nice to listen to music or enjoy the silence, it can also be nice to continue learning during the extra time. Thank you, podcasts!


Many don’t realize that podcasts are not just about entertainment. There is a great variety of valuable educational content and subject matter out there, ranging from practical to spiritual. Podcasts can be beneficial not just for you but for helping those in your congregation learn.


And did I mention that podcasts themselves are free? The term “subscribe” can be a bit misleading, but this just means that you are giving permission for the podcast to send you new episodes. It doesn’t require you to pay for it.


Getting Started

For Apple mobile device users, simply download the podcast app. For Android users, there are many possibilities: some free, some requiring a subscription. If you prefer to listen from a computer, a number of podcasts also have the audio available on its website.


If you haven’t yet delved into the world of podcasts, I encourage you to check it out. Here are some recommendations to get you started.


Leadership:

Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast – conversations with top ministry leaders of the day

Catalyst Podcast – interviews with Christian leaders


Youth Ministry:

Thinkorange Podcast – “ideas and conversations to help you influence the next generation”

Youth Culture Matters from The Center for Parent/Youth Understanding (CPYU) – “helping parents, youth workers, educators pastors and others understand and reach today’s youth culture”

Download Youth Ministry (DYM) – “a collection of shows to help you win in youth ministry”


Culture and context:

On Being with Krista Tippett – this podcast seeks to have conversations about the questions of meaning in our current context


Preaching:

Sermon Brainwave by Working Preacher – geared towards helping pastors interpret and preach the weekly lectionary



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Your Congregation and Innovation


The Harvard Business Review defines innovation as “the difficult discipline of newness.” What new thing is forming in your congregation? The congregation I attended last Sunday is starting a Friday night dinner, which will end with communion. In explaining the gathering, the pastor said “We don’t have to wait for Sunday to break bread together.”


My colleague Kara Faris and I have learned about the difficult discipline of newness from 12 innovative congregations. Stories from leaders of these congregations are in the book Divergent Church.


We learned of six practices evident in various configurations among these congregations. By practices, we mean universal human activities that take on unique and often new shape in these innovative congregations.


The congregations told remarkable stories that featured creative expressions of these six practices:




  • Shaping Community

  • Conversation

  • Artistic Expression

  • Breaking Bread

  • Community Engagement

  • Hospitality


If you were given full license to innovate regarding a practice, which practice would you choose and what would the innovation look like?


If you are interested in reading the book Divergent Church email me at tshapiro@centerforcongregations.org and I will send you a copy.


To learn more about congregations and innovation, take a look at the blog From Hallowed Space to Holograms and the organization Ministry Incubators.


By the way, the congregation starting the Friday night gathering is celebrating its 150th anniversary. Innovation is not dependent on a congregation being shiny and new.


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4 Questions Before Redesigning Your Website

Websites are the “front door” for congregations, and having a web presence is no longer optional. Visitors often search for a new church home online. Savvy congregations even use their websites to gather information from people.


Investing the right resources in a website can help your congregation attract new visitors and better interact with members. Ask yourself these questions before jumping into your website project.



  • What is our budget?

  • What are our goals for the website? Examples: To share information, gather new information, reach new people, interaction, advertise, etc.

  • Who will maintain the site and can they devote enough time to this work?

  • Based on who will be maintaining the site, what type of training do we need?


Considering those questions will help you find the right web-solution for your congregation.


For more info about website strategy, start with the article Designing Your Congregation’s Website.  You can also read What Makes A Good Church Website to learn smart tips from other congregations.


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Key Practices of Thriving Congregations

How would you describe a thriving congregation? Perhaps a thriving congregation has young people attending worship. Another thriving congregation might manage conflict well.


At the Center for Congregations in Indiana, we interact with all kinds of flourishing congregations. Here’s what we’re learning from faith communities that thrive.


 


Healthy Strategies



  • Focus on congregational assets rather than problems. Reframe observations as a positive question “What is going well?”

  • Learn to do new things. This encourages intentional growth as a community. See the book How Your Congregation Learns.

  • Help your people to live life well. Connect teachings, worship, and faith convictions to the challenges and opportunities of everyday life.


As part of our work, we captured the stories of 12 innovative, thriving congregations around the United States. Below are some of their common practices.


 


Intentional Practices of Innovative Congregations



For more information, see the book Divergent Church.


On the surface, thriving may look like growing worship attendance or conflict management. By considering the strategies and practices listed above, your congregation can take new steps to thrive.


 


For further discussion

Brainstorm strategies or practices that happen within thriving congregations.


 


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FACT Gearing Up for 2020 Survey

The new Faith Communities Today (FACT) survey is in the works. The survey officially launches next year, and FACT is in the process of finalizing participants now. Faith groups and denominations will survey their congregations early next year. Take a look at the list of groups that have agreed to participate and ensure that your group is represented. If your religious body or denomination isn’t listed, you can contact FACT at sbrown@hartsem.edu to inquire about partnership opportunities.


FACT is an interfaith research organization that provides key information on a range of subjects relating to congregational life in America. Previous FACT surveys resulted in relevant findings about conflict, outreach, young adults, spiritual vitality and more.


The goal for this new report is to survey 20,000 congregations in 2020.


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